Food

Sunday Funday – Ballsy Bakso

Married life has been great, alhamdulillah, and I’ve had a free weekend last week. God knows how precious free weekends are for me, especially since I’m always working on weekends. Between trying to squeeze time for dates with F and whipping up something in the kitchen, I can’t imagine how life would be like with kids in the future. For now, I’m happy with my newlywed life.

I received a PR kit from Kang Kang noodles, which featured some of my usual favourites like the kway teow and hokkien mee as well as some of the products from their new wholewheat range. Blasphemy, I know, but I wanted to give this wholewheat range of noodles a chance, just like how I gave wholewheat pasta a chance many years ago. My imaginary Italian nona would be rolling her eyes to the heavens above, I’m pretty sure. But hey, change is good. So I have to give these new products a chance.

Baksa is traditionally an Indonesian beef broth noodles served with meatballs. The meatballs are usually dense, salty and filled with delicious MSG flavour. I know the world is divided on this magic powder called MSG, but for me, I eat whatever is served on my plate. I don’t add this magic powder to my own cooking.

So since I didn’t want that dense beef balls, I had to resort on making my own. Think of this bakso as Swedish meatballs meets chicken soup. Not exactly the original bakso but this is of course, the Modern Malay Kitchen. Hehehe.

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Ballsy Bakso
Serves 4
Preparation time: 1 hour
Cook time: 20 minutes

Ingredients:

Beef balls:

500g minced beef
125g breadcrumbs
1 teaspoon light soy sauce
1 teaspoon Moroccan Spice Rub (available here)
4 tablespoons cornstarch
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon baking powder
Half cube Knorr chicken stock
half teaspoon salt
half teaspoon black pepper
2 tablespoons coriander leaves, chopped

Pureed to a fine paste:
1 medium sized red onion
2 cloves garlic
half inch ginger

Broth:

2 stalks coriander leaves, knotted
2 stalks spring onion, knotted
1 medium sized red onion, minced
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 litres chicken stock (I used Adam Liaw’s method of making chicken stock for this but feel free to cheat your way! Not judging, I promise!)
1 inch ginger, peeled and bruised

Garnish:

2 eggs, boiled for 5 minutes so the yolks are runny
1 carrot, julliened
2 stalks spring onion, chopped
2 stalks coriander, chopped
Sambal kicap (sweet soy sauce and chopped chilli padi)

Method:

  1. Mix all the ingredients together until well combined.
  2. Roll out the meat into small balls and set aside in the fridge until ready to cook.
  3. In a medium sized pot, heat 2 tablespoons of oil.
  4. Add in minced onion and garlic, and saute for about 4 minutes.
  5. Add in spring onion and coriander leaves and ginger.
  6. Add in chicken stock and simmer for 15 minutes on low heat.
  7. In a separate pot, boil water for the meatballs and noodles.
  8. Add meatballs in the boiling water and cook for about 3 minutes. Remove from pot and set aside.
  9. Add noodles and cook for about 3 minutes till the noodles are separated. Drain and set aside till ready to serve.
  10. Heat a heavy bottom pan with oil enough to cover the base.
  11. When oil has heated up, pan fry the meatballs on high heat for about 2 minutes, until the outsides are browned.
  12. Serve while hot with garnishes.
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Food, Love, Musings, Recipes from the Heart

Beef Stew with Focaccia

It’s day 9 of Ramadhan and somehow I’ve taken over my mum’s kitchen for good. I’m enjoying this gap year very much – taking photos, cooking, experimenting with new recipes, traveling – basically doing a lot of what I love. I’ve lasted seven months of freelancing thus far and life seems great right now. Alhamdulillah, the doors of rizq (wealth/earnings – there doesn’t seem to be an apt English word for it) are always open. I cannot thank Him enough for His bountiful blessings on me and my family.

I have been cooking a lot this Ramadhan, except for the days I am forced to iftar outside, I’m practically in the kitchen. It helps that HalalFoodHunt lets me hone my photography skills and develop recipes from the comforts of my home. If you’re wondering what this HalalFoodHunt is, click on it and check it out. You won’t regret it, well, unless you’re still fasting at this time of the day ’cause all you’ll see are food, food and more food.

This is my first time making this stew, and I’m pretty stoked by the results. I read up on a few recipes, mainly Jamie Oliver’s, Nigella as well as At Home with Magnolia Bakery. Since I’ve been under-utilizing my cookbooks, I forced myself to use the one from Magnolia Bakery. I altered the recipe here and there in terms of method but the ingredients are pretty much the same. The recipe calls for red wine but for obvious reasons, I switched it with chicken stock instead. I served the stew with some homemade focaccia bread and they were a hit with my mum and brother. Speaking of which, I think I’ll put up the recipe for the focaccia up soon.

Beef Stew (Adapted from At Home with Magnolia)

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Ingredients:

4 tablespoons olive oil

One large red onion, diced

Three shallots, finely sliced

Half a knob of garlic, chopped

300g premium beef, cubed

2 heap tablespoons of plain flour

1 tablespoon of paprika

Salt and pepper to taste

One carrot, diced

One celery stick, diced

One can of chopped pomodoro tomatoes

One tablespoon tomato paste

One cube of chicken stock

Three medium sized russet potatoes, cut into chunks

 

Method:

  1. In a deep pot, heat up oil on a medium heat.
  2. Sautee onion and shallots till fragrant. Add in garlic.
  3. In a bowl, rub in flour, paprika, salt and pepper with the meat. Ensure all of the meat is coated.
  4. Add in the meat with all of the remaining flour mixture into the pot. Fry all sides of the meat.
  5. After the meat has browned, add in carrots and celery, and mix well.
  6. Add in tomatoes, tomato paste, chicken stock, and 2 cups of water into the pot.
  7. Simmer on low heat for 2 hours, remember to stir constantly.
  8. Add in potatoes and continue to cook for another half and hour, stirring every now and then.
  9. Serve with bread or on a bed of rice.

 

 

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